Mads Perch and Gemma Fletcher’s Projections series isn’t technically groundbreaking (here's an example I shot in 2003), but it is superbly made. I found the above image truly mesmerizing. (via Fubiz)

Tilde.club

As the creator, Paul Ford (also), defines it, "a cool place where people can just hang out and make web pages on the web".

The Tilde Club no longer accepts new members, which is unfortunate but understandable since this is not supposed to be Ello but rather something like an doomed-utopian Geocities, webrings included. And I do think there’s something wonderful about randomly clicking through the webpages Tilde members have been “making on the web” (eg. this page that pulls you beyond the 1990s cyberspace event horizon). As Ford tweeted, it’s refreshing to see people doing things rather than just saying things — which, coming to think of it, would be the core difference between the Early Web and the Centralized & Appified Web of nowadays. 

A triumph for the Indie Web!

Ti Lurdes Sep 11th

Ti Zé Camilo Sep 9th

Aldeia do Trinta Sep 10th

Videmonte Sep 11th

Vale Sep 9th

1696 Sep 12th

Bom dia, Videmonte Sep 10th

A vista de casa Sep 12th

Ensaio geral de 'Transumância' com malta de Famalicão da Serra, Fernão Joanes e Videmonte Sep 14th

Alvorada Sep 9th

Arco Sep 12th

Fernão Joanes Sep 9th

Penúltimo dia Sep 14th

I spent a week in residence with the Teatroensaio company in the countryside, recording landscapes and interviewing locals in the villages of Famalicão da Serra, Fernão Joanes and Videmonte deep near Serra da Estrela. Some of the material was for the video projections of the Transumância play, and the rest will be edited into a documentary film. More soon!

Thomas Dreher’s History of Computer Art is gold. A PDF compilation of all lectures is also available at the site.

The photo is of Karl Otto Götz in front of Density 10:3:2:1, an early glitch-alike / algorithmic artwork (1961), reproduced from here.

Jim Leonard’s (aka Trixter) 8088 Domination, a PC demo that makes use of some neat tricks to display fullscreen color video on a 1981 IBM PC. Keeping in mind that these thirty-three year old machines are orders of magnitude less powerful than today’s electronics, you can see how today’s software is incredibly bloated stuff built atop piles upon piles of abstraction.

If three decades later someone can figure out how to display video using a modest early model PC, what kind of applications will someone build, three decades hence, extracting every bit of capability from today’s computers bare metal?

The curtains are drawn. Some light comes through, casting a small glow on the top left of the air conditioner. It’s daytime. The wall is an undecorated slab of beige. That is the American room.

The American Room is a terrific article in which Paul Ford presents an analysis of US homes and suburbs starting from a study of the rooms found in the background of so many YouTube videos.

I can’t quite place it but I once heard someone claiming that one of the world’s biggest libraries of pornographic film belonged to this US university’s Furniture Design department, allegedly because porn would be a reliable historical record of cheap furniture — a bit like this blog [probably sued out of existence by IKEA’s lawyers hence the Buzzfeed link]. (I tried to search for the library but I found it ungoogleable.)

Reading The American Room also reminds me of Dutch artist Martijn Hendricks' works, such as the This is Where We’ll Do It series in which he removes elements from the foreground of YouTube videos.