Posts tagged art

This audio-controlled Hockney Delayer sketch works much like the Directional Delayer I posted earlier: a buffer holds a number of video frames, as the screen is made out of a grid of cells, each selecting its bit from a frame in that buffer. How further back?, being mapped to the audio amplitude. (I also added a bit of ‘jitter’, moving and slightly enlarging the cells according to the same audio amplitude.)

My intention here was to translate something like David Hockney’s collages (earlier post) to video. I’m not sure it works. Here’s another example, splicing together different video files. Both share the same audio track, again hastly assembled from TB Arthur’s free sound library, by the way. You can check the code in my Processing 3.x Github repository.

Noya and Bill Brandt with Self Portrait (Although They Were Watching This Picture Being Made), by David Hockney (1982). A fascinating pience on its own merits, discussed as metaphor in Frank Chimero’s great speech about responsive web design and technological determinism The Web’s Grain. Go read it, now.

Windows 93 is so good. This browser-based ‘operating system’ by Zombectro and Jankenpopp is a trippy homage to the Windows 3.1 — 95 era one can lose himself in.

A couple of weeks ago I led a workshop on ‘analog software’ during the FuturePlaces media lab here in Porto. Influenced by Casey Reas’ articulation between creative coding and conceptual art I had expected participants to be interested in sketching procedural graphics on paper or canvas. Instead, I seemed to have struck a deeper chord by mentioning in passing SocialFiction’s .walk. Participants became more interested in ‘coding’ performative behaviour and questioning the way software is eating the world, which was a very welcome surprise.

A more detailed debriefing is up at the FuturePlaces website. Please also be sure to read Sara Moreira's Coding as Cooking essay which is a very interesting personal testimony, relating the Analog Software workshop with the great Frugal Food Challenge we had both attended and had a lot of fun at.

Mads Perch and Gemma Fletcher’s Projections series isn’t technically groundbreaking (here's an example I shot in 2003), but it is superbly made. I found the above image truly mesmerizing. (via Fubiz)

Thomas Dreher’s History of Computer Art is gold. A PDF compilation of all lectures is also available at the site.

The photo is of Karl Otto Götz in front of Density 10:3:2:1, an early glitch-alike / algorithmic artwork (1961), reproduced from here.

The curtains are drawn. Some light comes through, casting a small glow on the top left of the air conditioner. It’s daytime. The wall is an undecorated slab of beige. That is the American room.

The American Room is a terrific article in which Paul Ford presents an analysis of US homes and suburbs starting from a study of the rooms found in the background of so many YouTube videos.

I can’t quite place it but I once heard someone claiming that one of the world’s biggest libraries of pornographic film belonged to this US university’s Furniture Design department, allegedly because porn would be a reliable historical record of cheap furniture — a bit like this blog [probably sued out of existence by IKEA’s lawyers hence the Buzzfeed link]. (I tried to search for the library but I found it ungoogleable.)

Reading The American Room also reminds me of Dutch artist Martijn Hendricks' works, such as the This is Where We’ll Do It series in which he removes elements from the foreground of YouTube videos.