Listing all posts tagged architecture

Tweets for Thursday, March 6th

Thursday, August 1st 2013

When I was a kid I would stand on my head and force myself into odd perceptions. I would pretend being able to walk in the ceiling or in the walls, wishing hard to defeat gravity.

In Rubix, Christ Kelly renders a city as the faces of a moving Rubik cube. Even though the 3D execution isn’t up to par with videos such as Alex Roman’s The Third & The Seventh (another veritable architectural video megademo), Rubix's concept makes it oddly compelling. I'm hooked.

Saturday, October 29th 2011

Here’s another video I’ve worked on recently — a short study about a local architectural landmark, the Miradouro hotel and restaurant, which is the highest spot in Porto (we don’t have many impressive or tall buildings around here). I did the camera work and the post-production for my architect friend Alexandra Areia, and I’m happy to report the video is one of the finalists at the creative video contest we submitted it to.

Thursday, September 1st 2011

That which we have now, having never been

An interesting post on urban renewal, real estate speculation, nostalgia and gentrification. This seems a pretty universal phenomenon: right now downtown Porto has a mix of successful (?) and not-successful renewal, in the form of new drinking establishments all over the place and costly overhyped low-quality apartments like those the article describes. The former are all too dependent on fashions and are risky business, while the latter can’t have a good future value — being located in buildings surrounded by abandoned fire hazards, in streets where the drunken hordes roam on weekends.

Friday, April 22nd 2011

Sunday, August 15th 2010

Friday, April 30th 2010

Saturday, January 9th 2010

Alex Roman’s The Third & The Seventh. This video shows what really matters in CG: even though the long shots may not be the very best architectural renderings I’ve seen (the textures look rather flat sometimes), the lighting, the camera moves and the small details (specks of dust, etc) make for one really engaging piece.

All done by a single person using a desktop computer — this is what William Gibson meant when he coined the expression “Garage Kubrick”.