A pledge of autonomy

I recently read Parimal Satyal's essay Against an Increasingly User-Hostile Web, and realized how I could be doing much better. Indeed, Parimal's advice towards the end of the article is very important to web users and creators alike, and I here am I taking some of that advice.

For all of my sporadic talk about the Indie Web and nostalgia for the simpler days of Geocities, Web rings, and then Blogger and blogrolls, the fact remains that, like the proverbial frog, it's true one finds himself more and more dependent on the whims and formats imposed by a handful of media brands themselves under the control of no more than a couple of companies — Google and Facebook. It's a fact I've maintained this very website since I started it (at some other domain) in 1998, and always tried to make sure anything I posted in a, for the lack of better word, regulated platform was always backed up here or some other place under my control. (Besides, having nearly all of the posts, photos, etc. I share on the internet made public is a good way of not kidding myself about those platforms 'privacy' settings. Private stuff just doesn't go online.)

I want to offer a number of apologies to my readers here. I apologize for having had Facebook and Twitter share buttons, a naïve way of encouraging you to share whatever you found interesting here and to hopefully get more visitors to this website — in simpler words, for my egotism. And I also apologize for having run Google Analytics out of curiosity. I apologize for foolishly letting these companies spy on your visits to this website.

2nd International Conference on Micronations, photographed by Leo de Lafontaine

Therefore, I henceforth pledge to try to create and maintain my websites in autonomy, and to avoid having them making connections to companies that will use them as part of an advertising-surveillance apparatus.

So far, I've got my websites rid of connections to Facebook, Twitter and Google Analytics. Links to original sources remain, but should be harmless unless you enable prefetching (which I believe you shouldn't). I still maintain the use of Google Web Fonts because, well, I am incredibly anal about typography, but that's next on the list to go. I must also disclose that I have got a few domains managed through CloudFlare, including this site's HTTPS, which is something I have mixed feelings about, but still can live with. The share buttons at the end of each of article have also been replaced with a single permalink er... link, so you are, of course, free to copy and paste the URL and share my posts wherever you please. I sure share them on Facebook! :-)

As a web user, I also followed a few recommendations that did't require more than five minutes and don't disrupt my habits the least: I added HTTPS Everywhere to my browser extensions, alongside uBlock Origin, which I've used for quite a while. I also set my search engine to Start Page, which is basically a track-blocking condom around Google Search (which, I have to concede, I am quite used to). I am already a big Pinboard user and can't recommend it enough (besides, Maciej Ceglowski really seems to be one of the Web's Good Guys).