As I rediscover the joys (or the ills) of vinyl, here’s Kai Schäfer incredible World Records series of photographs. I can’t stop wondering about the lighting setup, as the photos seem rendered rather than captured somehow. (via Wired.com)

Videolab is an educational software piece that teaches and lets users experiment with concepts of digital video technology. It can be used standalone by students or as a lecturing tool by instructors.

I developed this Educational Software project as part of the coursework required for my Digital Media PhD, but I hope it’ll come handy in my own teaching. This prototype was made with Processing 2.08b and was thoroughly tested on Windows, but should work on other systems as well.

Ted Nelson’s Computer Lib / Dream Machines: there’s a link to a downloadable PDF (of questionable legality and reliability) at the bottom of the page, so hurry up! (via Radio-Activity)

Nelson, of course, is the wacky David Lynch-esque persona who invented the word ‘hypertext’ and fought for an alternate (some might say DRM-enabled) Web for decades with Project Xanadu. Still, Nelson has none of that tired Silicon Valley entrepeneur bullshit rhetoric. His Computers for Cynics podcast (direct link to episode 0) has more wisdom about technology and control in it than the entire ouevre of ‘open source’ demagogues.

Flash project: I was going to spend last week helping out Joana with a promo video for the FAZ Ideas in Portuguese contest. Everything was going to be shot outdoors, however progress was irritatingly slow due to the heavy rain that fell all week. We couldn’t get a break. So yesterday and in despair, we scrapped nearly everything and started over, shooting stop-motion indoors as the rain fell outside almost to the very end, when we managed to get a couple of shots outside again.

And somehow it worked.

If you can read Portuguese, please visit and vote for us!

Observing a solar eclipse on January 1, 1907, in the Tian-Shan mountains, probably in modern-day Uzbekistan. This is a photograph taken by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky, a chemist and photographer who invented a new process for color photography and used it to document the Russian empire in the time period 1905-1915. You can view many of the photos on Flickr or at the Library of Congress.

— From the Science Tumblr.

It seems Twitter is seven today, to which my first reaction was “Wow, already?!” Lately I’ve been disappointed at Twitter’s handling of its API, so I’ve been hedging my microblogging through Identi.ca, but it is still worth remembering my first tweet:

Some things never change.

Google will shutdown Google Reader on July 1st.

This is terrible.

Not because I’m a heavy gReader user. I’ll have to move my subscriptions over to some alternative feed reader (like the appropriately-named The Old Reader) and import all my favourites to my Pinboard account, but that’s easy and not much of a problem.

This is terrible because this is the final nail in RSS’s coffin. Without a popular and efficient feed reader, those small personal blogs that made the Web great will struggle even more to find audiences. Blogging is dying, replaced by the efficient ‘sharing’ of Facebook and Twitter. RSS would have been the federated open alternative, but syndication is contrary to walled gardens.

It seems we came full circle. With the demise of Google Reader, it seems having a small online presence on the Web outside of Facebook or Tumblr or Twitter is again the province of hackers and nerds…